NASA Unveils the Dark Side of The Moon

Astronomy
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How Moon looks like from the Earth, we already know. But what about the dark side of the moon?

Images from the Universe are always fascinating, no matter how often we have seen them. They have some sort of exclusivity, some form of uniqueness because we don’t get to see them when we want to just with our eyes.  Sometimes, I find myself wondering, how the dark side of the Moon looks like.

As we all know, as the Earth rotates around the Moon, we can only see one side of our orbiting Moon. NASA stated, that the dark side of the Moon looks quite different. It doesn’t have the large dark spots called maria. Instead, there are craters. All of them have different sizes and are connected together over the entire far side.

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Maria on the nearside of the Moon, source

“The far side was first seen in a handful of grainy images returned by the Soviet Luna 3 probe, which swung around the Moon in October 1959.” NASA said in an official statement. The dark side of the Moon is also place, where we can see one of the largest and oldest impact features in the solar system, the South Pole-Aitken basin. Roughly 2,500 kilometers (1,600 mi) in diameter and 13 kilometers (8,1 mi) deep. For better instance, it is probably the size of Northern and Southern Ireland combined together. It is visible as a bit darker spot that covers the bottom third of the Moon.

This video was created thanks to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) robotic spacecraft. The orbiter has been scouring Moon’s surface since 2009 and sending information back to NASA scientists. The video about the dark side of the Moon is in extreme detail. It is due to LRO camera, which is able to create very detailed images. See for yourself in the video below, which unveils the dark side of the Moon.

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Michaela Miklusak

Michaela Miklusak is deputy editor of TechandFacts.com and big technology enthusiast. Michaela now lives in Singapore, where she studies System Engineering and Informatics. michaelam@techandfacts.com

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